How To Make 1:12 Scale Dollhouse Food: Croissants

I decided to make some 1:12 miniature dollhouse croissants and they were simple once I figured out the triangle shape. Since they’re basically a triangle that you roll up, it’s pretty easy to cut the starting shape to scale.

The main tools that you would need for this are a ruler and an Exacto or another type of knife to cut the shapes out.


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Scale for dollhouse croissants.

For a scaled-down croissant that starts out as a triangle with a 6″ long base, the following sizes would be used:

Dollhouse scalelength of the longer edge
1:61″
1:121/2″
1:241/4″
1:481/16″
1:1441/32″
Dollhouse scale chart for croissants with a 6″ triangle base

The 1:48 and 1:144 scales are going to be major challenges. Use a magnifying glass and pray that it works.


Materials you’ll need:


How to make 1:12 scale dollhouse croissants.

Make the triangles for the croissants about 1/2″ wide on the base to get to the 1:12 scale.

Cut out 1" square from rolled-out polymer clay.
Cut out 1″ square from rolled-out polymer clay.

Start by rolling out a thin piece of polymer clay, then cut a 1″ square from it.


Cut the tip off of the square with the smaller cutter.
Cut the tip off of the square with the smaller cutter.

Using the 1/2″ cutter, cut a corner off of the square. Make it into a triangle by cutting from the edges of the 1/2″ cutter mark to the opposite corner. This will make a thin triangle that will roll up well.


Start rolling the croissant up from the wider end.
Start rolling the croissant up from the wider end.

Using a needle tool, start rolling the polymer clay up, starting from the wide end and rolling it toward that point.

The rolled-up croissant.
The rolled-up croissant.
Bend the rolled-up clay into a crescent shape.
Bend the rolled-up clay into a crescent shape.

When you’re done rolling, bend the croissant into a crescent shape.


Make a bunch of little croissants.
Make a bunch of little croissants.
Little croissants for dollhouse food.
Little croissants for dollhouse food.

When you’ve made a bunch of croissants, put them on a piece of parchment paper and bake them to harden the clay.


For an article about how to make a 1:12 scale cake tier, click here.


Bake them according to the instructions on the clay that you’re using. It’s usually 15 minutes for 1/4″ thickness, so 15 minutes at 275F will be enough for these.


Paints to use for the cookies.
Paints to use for the croissants.

I used watercolor paints in white, yellow ochre, burnt umber and raw umber to paint the croissants.

You should start with the lighter colors and then add come darker details to mimic the darkened areas of baked goods.


Start by painting the croissants with the lighter brown colors.
Start by painting the croissants with the lighter brown colors.

The base color was some white mixed with yellow ochre. If you started with a very pale light brown polymer clay you can skip this part)

Apply the first coat of paint to the entire croissant.


Add a little bit of darker brown to the edges.
Add a little bit of darker brown to the edges.

Using some raw umber or burnt umber, mix it into the lighter color to make some darker brown areas on the edges of the croissants. Use a photo of real croissants as a guide for where to put the darker areas.

When the paint dries, you can glaze the croissants if you want them to have a slightly shiny appearance, like they would if they were freshly baked.


For another article about making tiny chocolate chip cookies, click here.


Use these teeny croissants for a bakery window or a kitchen scene.

Kara

Kara is a former wedding cake decorator who has won numerous awards for her cake designs and gingerbread houses. She currently owns a cake decorating supply business at acaketoremember.com

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